My ‘right’ or your ‘right’

December 15, 2015

What would happen if I didn’t cave in to the hard-wired compulsion to be right that seems to live in me and in almost everyone I know?

  • If I didn’t need to be right I might ask more questions and offer fewer declarations – which might open the door for you to offer your ideas and expand my thinking.
  • If I didn’t need to be right I might stop noodling around the worn-out ideas that I’ve been rehashing for years and make room for new ones.
  • If I didn’t need to be right I might be excited and open to looking for novel ways of doing familiar things.
  • If I didn’t need to be right I might brave new adventures.  I could do with a few more brain cells at this point and I understand that any new activity keeps them coming.
  • If I didn’t need to be right I might view the world differently.  More like a tapas bar that tempts me with lots of small bites, and less like a sterile cafeteria of repeating Wednesdays with meatloaf and potatoes.
  • If I didn’t need to be right I might become more interesting.  Especially to myself.  I’m stuck with me so this one seems especially important.
  • If I didn’t need to be right I might actually see you.  There’s a word that is used as a greeting by the Zulu tribe in Africa.  The word is Sawubona.  It means ‘I see you’.
  • If I didn’t need to be right, maybe I would be more real?  Maybe that would help you see me?  What would it be like if just for a moment we were totally present and seeing each other?  Behind the masks, facades, defenses?

This particular Seedlings comes from my recent increased awareness that I know so very little about what makes the world act the way it does, or what makes people act the way they do.  Everywhere I turn someone has ‘the answer’.  Someone is offering their ideas about how things should work.  Oddly, so far, no one has come up with the perfect answer for who I should be, how I should act, and what I should think or feel.

So I’m pulling off my blinders and setting aside my opinions, and coming home to my own discomfort.  That’s the place where I can see what feels ‘right’ to me.  Not the definitive ‘right’ as in ‘I have the ultimate truth’.  ‘Right’ with myself.

What feels ‘right’ to you?  Do you have a still small voice inside that’s calling you to come home to yourself and invest some time in finding your own ‘right’, a way of being that reflects your best and most generous and courageous self?

I’d love to hear your voice and your personal ‘right’.

Much love,